About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNNW 7
FBC 6
MSNBCW 6
CNN 4
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN2 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 50
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
tomorrow. it will take some time for that would support for president mohammed morsi we be judgment for what constitution should look like. will he prevail? will he come at the end of the process, process the powers that he claimed for himself two years ago, of which he has since relinquished? >> unfortunately, my answer is going to be yes. one saying that we need to reject the referendum, the other part is saying no, we want to boycott. so now they are divided. the result is going to be the muslim rotherhood and president morsi is most likely going to win the referendum. on the other hand, the opposition is very strong in egypt. there is no return to the previous situation. what i suggest in the future is that mohammed morsi ll win the referendum, try tooit establish an islamic state, he will see strong opposition for months and months. lou: moving quickly to syria as we wrap up. russia today -- from the deputy foreign minister, basically saying that they have acknowledged that bashar al-assad has been losing power and that his departure is a foregone conclusion. suddenly they are
referendum tomorrow. it will take some time for that would support for president mohammed morsi we be judgment for what constitution should look like. will he prevail? will he come at the end of the process, process the powers that he claimed for himself two years ago, of which he has since relinquished? >> unfortunately, my answer is going to be yes. one is saying that we need to reject the referendum, the other part is saying no, we want to boycott. so now they are divided. the result is going to be the muslim brotherhood and president morsi is most likely going to win the referendum. on the other hand, the opposition is very strong in egypt. there is no return to the previous situation. what i suggest in the future is that mohammed morsi will win the referendum, try tooit establish an islamic state, he will see strong opposition for months and months. lou: moving quickly to syria as we wrap up. russia today -- from the deputy foreign minister, basically saying that they have acknowledged that bashar al-assad has been losing power and that his departure is a foregone conclusion.
constitution for that country. one that gave president mohammed morsi new powers. steve harrigan is standing by live in cairo with more. >> remarkable scene in cairo this morning outside egypt supreme constitutional court. to put it simply, the court justices could not get in their own building. the judges will suspend their work while the atmosphere of intimidation physical a mental intimidation exist. the supreme court say they cannot do the work because of the mob around their building. it was likely they would rule on the legitimacy of egypt constitutional assembly. that body pushed through the constitution, the draft on friday. they go for a national referendum, up or down vote on december 15. if the constitution goes through, egypt president morsi says the extreme powers which he declared that he possessed would be void and it would go to normal here in egypt. richard morrison himself has strong public support. we have 200,000 people. mainly members of the muslim brotherhood who support the president come out on the street to show support. loud and emotional way. >> shannon: steve harr
revolt. but megyn: violent protests outside of egypt right now. members of president mohammed morsi's islam brotherhood. just think about what has happened here. the folks gathered en masse to protest the old leader, hosni mubarak. the muslim brotherhood said let's go for it. they reversed themselves and they rimini one. now, the people are back on the streets, protesting the new democratic policies by the new guy, where he did this huge paragraph, said that he could ignore the supreme court, pushed to the constitution, highly questionable, and the people in egypt are wondering what happened. human rights activists inside the country are claiming that the muslim brotherhood is now paying thugs to sexually assault women and physically assault men who gather in the square. fox news is not able to confirm these reports. several activists on the ground say that situation is getting very ugly again. steve harrigan is live from cairo. reporter: megyn, these are some of the worst clashes that we have seen so far in the protest. in the past, it has been pleased battling the protesters. righ
harrigan. since mohamed morsi, the president there assumed near absolute powers through a constitutional move. he and the muslim brotherhood have been doing things that have a lot of people concerned in terms of ramming through a very controversial new constitution that the people have been very unhappy about. what's going on there. come back home now for a moment and take a look at the latest numbers we have got on the u.s. economy. the weekly unemployment numbers came in as they do every thursday. the labor department reported 370,000 americans filed for first-time unemployment claims. either way, either way, folks, your taxes will go up despite the haggling going on on capitol hill. you will be paying more to the u.s. government. stuart varney joins me now. so, stuart, that's the bottom line. this is what people i think across the country are starting to realize no matter what they negotiate, 2013 will be different for most of us. >> this is the untold tax story. everybody has been concentrating on tax the rich, yes or no. but the payroll tax holiday goes away january 1. neither polit
. thanks. >>> in egypt, opponents of president mohammed morsi are expected to take to the streets again. they were out in force last night in cairo chanting it was time for their president to resign. their anger was sparked two weeks ago when morsi granted himself sweeping powers. last night, morsi refused to rescind that decree, despite calls from proponents calling for him to do so. >>> the photographer who took a picture of a man standing on the subway tracks as a train approached insists he was trying to alert the driver of the train. that photo make it on the front page of the "new york post" it is sparking outrage. people are asking why the photographer did not do more to help the victim? he told anderson cooper he was too far away on the platform to do anything else. >> the only way i thought at that moment was to start clicking away, using the shutter to fire the flash and maybe -- >> you thought that might warn the conductor? >> the victim was pushed on to the tracks. he said the only thing he would have urged him to do differently is to out-run the train. >>> seven new counts
: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first freely-elected president. after riot police gave up keeping the two warring sides apart. seven people were killed and hundreds were injured. both sides were armed with clubs, but eyewitnesses said the first gunfire came from president morsi's supporters. the president's opponents let off fireworks. but they say they won't back down until the president gives up sweeping new powers or resigns. this morning, the army moved in. not to mount a military coup, but to defend a president they would once have jailed for his political views. the commander of these troops said these tanks were just to keep rival factions apart.
it. >>> again today the crowds are still demanding that president mohammed moed morsi step down. latest from cairo. >>> free market capitalism is the best bet for -- i don't think we should be raising taxes at all. but that's my point of view. i'm kudlow. we'll be right back two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. . >>> tens of thousands of protesters are still surging around egypt's presidential palace. nbc reporter joins us now with the details. good evening, eamon. >> reporter: the media is reporting that the country's commission has ordered a vote scheduled to begin tomorrow in embassies around the world on the country's draft constitution to be postponed
fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> a
grab by the democracy's president, mohamed morsi. right now, soldiers are setting up barricades as morsi's opponents plan a million man march in cairo's tahrir square later today. last night, army tanks surrounded the presidential palace as thousands of protesters waved flags and shouted "topple the regime." you may remember, that's the same chant heard during the revolution that brought down egypt's dictator hosni mubarak. in a tv address thursday, morsi failed to defuse growing anger, saying his absolute powers will expire with a new vote on resolution and constitution on december 15th. >>> speaking on human rights at a university in dublin, secretary of state hillary clinton called for urgent dialogue to ease the unrest in egypt. >> we call on all the stakeholders in egypt to settle their differences through discussion and debate, not through violence. >> clinton also called on egypt's leaders to protect the country's promise of post-revolution democracy. >>> back here at home, as the fiscal cliff standoff continues in washington, the president took his plan out of town to no
outside the presidential palace. egyptian president mohamed morsi is calling for a national dialogue but is resolute about his controversial constitution. nbc's ayman mohyeldin is joining us live from cairo monitoring the situation. let's start with egypt. how much more trouble is morsi in there? >> reporter: well, he's definitely politically isolated because all of egypt's major political factions have really come out against him for both the constitutional decree that gave him absolute powers nearly two weeks ago and kicked off all of these protests, but more importantly, they're very upset with him that he's trying to ram home this constitution that was drafted by an assembly made up mostly of islamist parties loyal to the president within just two weeks. so, that's fueled a lot of the street anger, left six people killed. it also brought out the military outside of the presidential palace. today, the opposition is calling for another million man march. no doubt, though, that the president's politically isolated and under mounting public pressure. mika? >> let's go back to syria.
where there are new developments in the power struggle that started with p mohamed morsi's grab for new powers. we're there with details. ayman, we got word there were some considerations there to issue a new koconstitutional declaration of some sort. what can you tell us about all this? >> reporter: sure. it's important to set what triggered these protests two weeks ago, a constitutional declaration by president morsi that was seen as a power grab, gave him sweeping powers through the transitional period. it triggered protests. one of the central demands of the protesters and the opposition to the president has been that he rescind that dec e decree. for the past several days the p president has been trying to figure out a way to kind of minimize the scope of that decree. i has not worked. it has not pleased the opposition. today he met with some of the opposition forces, and what we're learning from egyptian state television, an official government news source, is that the prime minister has suggested that the president is considering a new constitutional declaration and perhaps in l
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
with egypt's president mohamed morsi. nbc is in cairo on this friday afternoon, friday night there in cairo. before we get to the protestors, sir, i know you have new information about voting on the country's draft constitution. what can you tell us about that? >> reporter: that's right, craig. in fact, breaking news just coming here it to nbc. that is that the vote scheduled to begin tomorrow for all egyptians living abroad. this was a vote on egypt's new draft constitution set to take place at embassies around the world. that vote now has been delayed according to egypt's electoral commission. the reason it's so important is because it is an indication as to the insight perhaps of egypt's president more hhamed m and what's taking place on the streets. protestors demand that president morsi rescind a decree that gave him absolute powers that he issued two weeks ago. also, they wanted to see president morsi delay the vote that was scheduled to take place on december 15th inside the country on this new draft constitution. while he has gone aahead and delayed that vote for egyptians living ab
and people say mohammed morrissey is this not an 80 character and no one takes them seriously. holding the real range power is the army, the guy in charge of the going on. then, the rest of the chiefs of staff, but were still extensively wandering away versus democratic mullally and future from our friends in the brotherhood. you have to just love it. when your eternal as life gives you phuket site to one of the 21st and 22nd of november. you have this incredible story in "the new york times" about how barack obama has established this confidence, trust. mohamed morsi has been minded to engineer the pragmatism the pragmatism in the next day he assumes dictatorial powers by declaring the timing was delicious. the point is this is the way the muslim brotherhood operates and anyone who understands that the brotherhood is out, cleanup adjustment taking could've seen this coming a long, long time ago. the conundrum is this, this is the essence of the problem. if you want to have a democratic process in the middle east, one that represents most of the people, you have to have islamist partie
's referendum vote on a divisive new constitution. it was drafted largely by allies of mohamed morsi. an egyptian spoke men said that they will aim at ending the political crisis. >>> and a global call for countries to lift their hiv travel restrictions. 45 nations seen on this map have laws that deport, detain, or deny entry to people who are hiv positive. now companies like coca-cola and gap and from the nba say those travel bans are discriminatory and bad for business. until recently, the u.s., too, had regular layings that barred foreign nationals from receiving a visa from entering the country. president obama lifted that ban in 2010. >>> and a chain of check stores is selling what they believe is the, yes, very last shipment of twinkies in the country. jewel said that hostess offered the entire shipment left in the georgia plant, including 20,000 boxes of twinkies and 5,000 boxes of ding dongs, zingers and you can buy them while supplies last but not for much longer. if you're thinking of the gift to give someone, just don't know what to get them, give them a twinkie. >> when w
supporters of president mohammed morsi, the muslim brotherhood, camed -- claimed victory in the first round of voting on morsi's draft constitution. this took place over the weekend. greg palkot streaming live from key owe egypt. greg? >> reporter: hey, jon, yeah. folks are a little bit on edge off voting over the weekend on the draft constitution. the results were closer than expected. the yes votes were 57%. no, 43%. the turnout was lower than usual. according to the opposition the vote was marched by maured by widespread irregularitis. opposition attacking opposition headquarters here in cairo. all that is prompting again by government critics who called for more protests on tuesday, in front. presidential palace in tahrir square behind me and up to the u.s. embassy. this is up to the second and final round of voting in rural areas of egypt on saturday for the constitution which is favored by egyptian president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood party. critics say it is too islamist. defenders say it is necessary to preserve stability here in this country. analysts are saying they
, thank you. >> now to the crisis in the middle east. rejecting president mohamed morsi's call for reconciliation, refusing to compromise last night as he spoke to the nation. earlier, morsi got a call from president obama after a deadly confrontation between morsi's supporters and his opponents. holly williams is outside the presidential palace in cairo. >> reporter: some people here hope that after days of protests and blood shed, president morsi would make a major concession last night when he addressed the nation in an effort to restore balance. we are expecting large protests here today outside the palace here in cairo. in the city of alexandria, there have been more violent clashes between president morsei's opponents and his supporters. the president's opponents are demanding that he immediately gives up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago. they also want him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, due to take place in just over a week. critics say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president mor
between unions and management. martha: egyptian protesters keeping up the pressure on president mohammed morsi. the latest in the clashes in tahrir square. the next hour of "america's newsroom" is coming up. don't go away. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or
on the constitution has become a referendum on egypt's islamic president, mohamed morsi. >> reporter: both sides of the egyptian political divide plan major marches and rallies this morning. government supporters are calling a yes vote on the referendum a vote for islam. the opposition is fragmented and far less organized and decided only a few days ago to vote no rather than boycott the ballot. the new constitution was drafted by the ruling islamist party and its hard-line political allies. the mainly secular opposition says the 63-page document does not represent all of egypt's 83 million people and tramples on the rights of minorities such as christians. a major problem is a lack of monitors. a significant number of judges have refused to supervisor the 13,000 polling stations so the voting will have to be held over two days first in major cities an then in the countryside. many egyptians are simply growing weary after two years of political turmoil. adding to their woes is the effect on the economy. the tourism industry has been hard-hit and the prospects of attracting f
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
the will -- >> these conditions that mohammed has put forward are unacceptable? >> everything could be discussed on the table, but not conditions. >> he says -- what about, are you open at least to postponing the referendum on the c constituti constitution? moving from december 15th? >> if we are returning back to the will of the people. why should we be -- we can change the constitution, if there is the will of the people to change it. and today it was announced that if there is a need for amendments we can elect a new parliament, and within the new parliament, they have the right to make changes to the prosecution. we insist on returning to the people. the regional source of power. >> the argument -- the accusation that's been made is that president morsi, he was democratically elected. he got just more than 51% of the vote, which is enough to get him elected president of egypt the first election in egypt ever shall we say. he's beginning to act like a dictator. >> well, i think this is unacceptable conditions. he is insisting on carrying on with the democratic process. he's devolving his powers, returning
waiting for president mohammed morsi to speak. this is after a night of violent clashes that killed six people and killed more than 670 injured. tanks, armored personnel carriers clearing the area, scattering clouds of 0 protesters fighting in the streets. the latest spiral of violence after morsi's sweeping power grab. supporters of the muslim brotherhood who back president morsi clashing with opponents saying he made himself a dictator. reza sayah in cairo, the president not spoken. when he does, what might he say? >> reporter: well, nobody really knows what he's going to say other than members of his inner circle, but certainly, there's a lot of pressure on president morsi to calm down this conflict that's been escalating over a few days, especially the last night. we've eagerly waiting for him to speak, but he hasn't spoken yet. we're not quite sure what the delay is. initially, word was that at 6:00 p.m. local time, three and a half hours ago, he was going to deliver his speech and then reports came that this was going to be a taped speech. taped the address. dlifed it to state med
: violent protest erupt in egypt overnight. overnight opponents of president mohammed morsi continue to demand that he step down since his power grab last month and back off. officials say at leastt 7 people were killed and more than 600 hurt in the last day or so . now the u.s. members of congress are callog the state department to suspend the two billion that we give egypt claiming that morce yehis men stand with terrorist. yoinning us now is vern bucan an. thanks for being here. congressman, thanks for being here. you want to see the two billion to be pulled back. >> i am introducing legislation to freeze the two billion. over the 30 years 60 billion and look at what is happening in egypt. they are supporting hamas and pull would their ambassador out of israel. why do we have to buy our friends especially we have concerns here. it is 52 billion in foreign aid. i am going to introduce legislation to freeze the two billion in egypt. >> brian: senator lindsay graham said we are watching you to see what is going on. i am just wondering in the big picture. if we need the leverage in tw
. mohammed, give us a sense. this is a pretty big fish for somebody to be leaving,nd i imagine he has valuable information as well being somebody part of the military police. >> reporter: that's right, suzanne. he identifies himself as a major general, that he's the chief of military police in syria. we spoke earlier with rebel free syrian army spokespeople. they said this was the man he claimed to be. the free syrian army helped to shuttle him to safety. it was a very difficult journey getting him from inside syria into neighboring turkey. it took far longer than they thought it would, and they were willing to help. other military officials wanted to defect for a certain amount of time longer. yes, as you said, if this turns out to be true and this man is as high-ranking as he said he is, this is a big blow to the regime. there's more and more high level defections the last several months. the fact more and more are coming seems to suggest he's losing more of a grip of power in syria. this is he not what they want out there when you have the u.n. and arab league enjoy trying to negot
is here. she's picking up that part of the story. >> embattled president mohammed morsi went on nationwide tv. he addressed the protests. he seemed to inflamed their outrage. within minutes, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in cairo was up in flames. reza joins us on the phone from cairo. we want to talk about president morsi in a second. first, you just arrived at the scene of the fire at the muslim brotherhood headquarters. what are you seeing, and what are you learning about who's responsible for this? >> reporter: let's verify what happened. two hours ago, they reported the main headquarters here in cairo was attacked by protesters and torched. we raced over here. we're in front of the headquarters right now. there's no indication of a fire here, but certainly there's a large group of what appear to be opponents of president morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they're trying to do everything they can to get to this building, and they're being blocked by police. so we have yet another standoff. if anyone thought president morsi's speech would pacify these people and calm them down, thi
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)